A Mediocre Life

Gratitude Day 331

Thurs., Sept. 26, 2019

1 Corinthians 3:18: Stop fooling yourselves. If you count yourself above average in intelligence, as judged by this world’s standards, you had better put this all aside and be a fool rather than let it hold you back from the true wisdom from above.

Is it wrong to want a mediocre life?

Yes, there was a time when I thought that I wanted to be someone. You know, a person whose names was recognized. Noteworthy. This was decades ago. Honestly, somewhere along the line, I lost this passion. Drive. Desire.

Now, I’m thinking mediocre is JUST. FINE.

It’s not that I’ve decided to sit on the couch all day, watch daytime television and eat bowl after bowl of ice cream. (I dream about the ice cream but I also want to fit into my pants.) I think there are opportunities for us to make small, significant contributions to our local communities day after day.

But my perspective has changed. I don’t desire to have a building named after me. Or anything else, for that matter.

I’m comfortable checking out at the grocery store and no one knowing who I am.

Or walking into the school and no one saying, “Pastor Dianne!”

I am committed to serving God, trying to make a difference in God’s kingdom and sharing my gifts and talents. I just don’t need special recognition or acknowledgement of this.

I can happily do without anyone being any more the wise.

Here’s the challenge: most people my age have been taught to work hard. Nothing wrong with this. The problem? We were also taught to keep moving towards something bigger and better and more notable. Yes, we need people like this. Our country and communities and local projects need a cheerleader who is willing to give of themselves. This is necessary.

What we don’t need to someone who does it purely for the recognition. Or atta–boys. It’s OK if the house isn’t perfectly clean or everything may not be in it’s place. It’s OK if we forget to pay a bill or miss an appointment. We can’t do everything right ALL. THE TIME.

It just isn’t possible.

These days, I’m being OK with moments when I accept “good enough.”  I’m trying to stop putting so much pressure on myself to do everything just “right,” whatever that means.

I’m trying to be more comfortable with dedicating time towards what is really important and life giving. I want my wisdom to be rooted in God’s wisdom; not the other way around. I’m trying to be more accepting of mistakes and being OK with today’s progress.

It’s taking time. It’s shifting my perspective. It’s downscaling my previous expectations.

Instead, I’m trying to be content with my mediocre life. And appreciate all that I have rather than focus on what I think I’m missing out of.

For a mediocre life, I am grateful. 

Dear God – I pray that we can be content and satisfied with where we are at in our life stage. Help us desire and year for a life in which we seek Your wisdom above our own. . Amen.

Blessings –

Dianne

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One Reply to “A Mediocre Life”

  1. I’m a wordsmith by nature, so forgive me what may seem like hairsplitting. I don’t see what you describe as mediocre at all, but as ordinary. I often find myself thanking God for the blessings of an “ordinary” life, and for the fact that my ego doesn’t need much outside gratification. At the same time, within the confines of a very ordinary life, there are always opportunities to do things (even small ones) that are actually quite “extraordinary.” Such as the simple yet beautifully meaningful prayers in your blog.

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